From High School to College or University – 2 – Preparing the Foundations of Successful Study

During the early days at college, you will be setting the foundations for all your future studies. This is, therefore, a crucial time in tilting you towards success or failure. As with anything new, you will soon form habits, and it is up to you to ensure that those habits are good habits.

There are certain areas of college life and study in which establishing good habits early on can help you towards your goal of good grades and a successful graduation. It is well worth focusing your attention on these areas before arriving at college, and in your first few weeks there. By doing so, you can establish some good study habits, and make your college life run that much more smoothly and successfully. The following are some of the key areas of your new life of college study where you will need solid preparation and attention from the outset.

Acknowledging the Competition

It is the brighter students at High School who will probably be the ones who make it to college and university. You were one of those, but you will notice a big difference in your relative position at college. Whereas before you may have been one of the top students in your class, once you get to college you will just be one of many bright students.

By being aware of this increased competition, and being mentally prepared for it, you are more likely to shine again in your new environment, rather than feeling overawed by the other intelligent students. Also bear in mind that with the right preparation and improvement of your study skills, and by establishing the right habits, you can perform better than even the most intelligent student.

Scheduling Your Time

One of the big differences at college will be the amount of “spare” time you have. You may only have 15 hours of lectures in a week, and it is up to you to schedule the rest of your time. Whether you succeed at college or not may well depend on how well you are able to organize yourself, and schedule your time to best effect.

So long as you are aware of the dangers of wasting that spare time, then you will have a chance of scheduling it wisely. Time management skills are therefore worth acquiring before you even go to college, and there is plenty of useful information online about managing time. Regard time management as an essential study skill, and prepare accordingly. It will stand you in good stead for the future after college as well, as time management is just as important in business or working life.

Harder Work

One thing is certain, and that is college work will be much tougher than High School work. If, after a few weeks, you do not think it is harder, then the chances are you have not grasped what you really need to do to keep up with and on top of your studies. You should go to college expecting to work hard, and then ensure that you do.

Note Taking

Another major difference between the learning methods at High School and college is the need, at college, to take copious notes in the lecture room. You should be mentally prepared for this at a minimum, but, like time management, you can acquire skills on note taking to make yourself more efficient. You will be pressed for time at college, so in every aspect of your study, it is wise to improve your study skill. That includes note taking.

Faster Reading

In the lecture room you need to become efficient at taking notes. Outside of the lecture room, you will have an enormous amount of reading to do. Such a volume may seem overwhelming, but reading is another area where you can improve, and thus increase your ability to study effectively. Speed reading is a talent anybody can acquire, and if you can acquire it before you reach college, so much the better.

Memory

Once at college, you will be bombarded with information, facts relating to the subjects you are studying. Being great at reasoning and making use of facts is no use if you cannot remember those facts in the first place. Improving your memory is therefore something you will benefit greatly from. Even if you think you have a good memory, you can improve further.

I went back to studying, for a professional qualification, 12 years after leaving school. Not being academic as a student, and having a “poor” memory, I knew I would have great difficulty competing mostly against 21/22 year olds fresh from university. So, I focused on my memory, learnt as much as I could about memory techniques, and that was enough (plus hard work, of course) to not only help me keep up, but in some cases keep ahead of the competition.

Improving memory really does make a big difference to your study prospects, and also in later working life. It is another study skill that will always be with you as you move on to other things after college or university.

By preparing yourself in the areas of note taking, time management, faster reading, and memory, you should have a head start on other students, even if they are brighter than you. By such preparation and focusing on your study skills before going to college, it is you who will appear the brightest, as you come across as well organized, able to grasp and recall facts with ease, and able to get through a lot more work in a shorter time than those around you.

Classroom Management Strategies For High School

The work of the educator particularly those in high schools has become more daunting with every passing decade. There are diverse behaviors and personalities in the modern day classrooms. When some high school students put up disruptive attitudes often inimical to their studies many new educators may conclude either prematurely or naively that such students are not fit for the school environment or that they are simply not willing to learn.

Educators should know that reasons abound for misbehavior of students: Many practicing educators often fail to realize that there are always reasons behind every disruptive behavior of high school students. We may pardon the new educators who are mainly fresh from prep courses because teacher prep courses often fail to equip potential educators with adequate high school classroom management techniques for the modern day classrooms thereby making building classroom discipline a daunting task for the majority of new educators at least within the first few years of their employment.

Educators of today teach high school students that are lacking in motivation and behavior management: Many experienced and concerned practicing educators know that the skills students need in order to be able to behave well and listen appropriately in class begin at home, but many educators find their students lacking in behavior management. Many students of today do not learn their values from their parents but rather from television sets, video games, and Hollywood because in most instances both parents are too busy with secular jobs or their businesses for too long that the training of their children have been left to chance or baby sitters or worst still sign them up for Little League, Soccer, and Summer Camp as opposed to being truly interested in the child’s development in values, work ethics, and good behavior influenced by parents themselves.

The task before educators of today: Educators of today have become surrogate parents by default but that is a task they are not inclined to accept or trained for. When students face pressures at home, it reflects in their characters at school by causing problems. Therefore, when the classroom seems unmanageable, it’s best for educators to look for proven techniques. Classroom management strategies are part of a continuing education program taught in classroom management workshops which every practicing educator should take interest in. The task before educators of today includes the followings:

There is the need for practicing educators to change their views when it comes to students with challenging behaviors. There is the need to shift focus from seeing misbehaved students as threats to the smooth running of the school or even as a threat to the civil society.

There is the importance of empathy and understanding in dealing with disruptive students while at the same time maintaining firmness for a change in behavior if educators intend to achieve success on their job.

Deliberate and joint efforts needs to be taken by educators in tackling behavior problems in school, though educators have different personalities yet they need to work together and respond to students who break rules the same way rather than different ways.